Georges Guétary - Les MeilleursGeorges Guétary - Les Meilleurs Screen Vinyl Image - RemixesScreen Vinyl Image - Remixes Various Artists - Memories of LoveVarious Artists - Memories of Love Amplifier - The OctopusAmplifier - The Octopus Various Artists - Revelation Records: Sampler 2000Various Artists - Revelation Records: Sampler 2000 Darrell Brent Le Lacheur - Don't Throw Your Life AwayDarrell Brent Le Lacheur - Don't Throw Your Life Away Jackie Wilson - Christmas Eve with Jackie WilsonJackie Wilson - Christmas Eve with Jackie Wilson Brian Mazzaferri - All Roads Lead To RoadsBrian Mazzaferri - All Roads Lead To Roads
» » Buddy DeFranco - Sweet and Lovely
Buddy DeFranco - Sweet and Lovely album download
Title:

Buddy DeFranco - Sweet and Lovely album download

Performer:
Buddy DeFranco
Album:
Sweet and Lovely
Style:
Bop
Released:
August 12, 1955 - August 26, 1955
Genre:
Duration:
41:31
MP3 archive size:
1309 mb
FLAC archive size:
1747 mb
Other formats:
ASF FLAC TTA DTS RA MP2
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
457

Recorded: September 1, 1954 and August 12 & 26, 1955 Los Angeles, CA. Other Versions (5 of 6) View All. Cat.

Sweet and lovely – but plenty darn soulful too – and one of the excellent early 50s Verve dates that features the piano of Sonny Clark with the clarinet of Buddy DeFranco ! The album's got an even more unusual twist in that it features a bit of organ from Clark too – one of his only recordings on the instrument – as well as guitar from Tal Farlow on a number of tracks – another leading light of the fresh Verve sound of the 50s, really working some great music next to Buddy's horn. The stripped down sound is very nice – equal parts bop and swing, in that unique mode that made DeFranco one of the hippest players on his instrument at the time! Titles include "Getting A Balance", "Old Black Magic", "Moe", and "What Can I Say".

Sweet And Lovely is a bop music album recording by BUDDY DEFRANCO released in 1956 on CD, LP/Vinyl and/or cassette. B4 Moe. Line-up/Musicians. Bass – Gene Wright Clarinet – Buddy DeFranco Drum – Bobby White Guitar – Tal Farlow Organ – Sonny Clark Piano – Sonny Clark. Verve Records ‎– MGV-8224 (US). Recorded: September 1, 1954 and August 12 & 26, 1955 Los Angeles, CA. Thanks to snobb for the addition. Defranco, Buddy Sweet & Lovely Other Swing Records.

Album: Sweet And Lovely (2018). Artist: Buddy DeFranco Quintet. Download for free and listen to Buddy DeFranco Quintet - But Beautiful. We have song's lyrics, which you can find out below. Org B Buddy DeFranco Quintet.

085-01-Buddy DeFranco-Sweet And Lovely. flac is being hosted on 9. 21. This file is of FLAC file extension. You can also upload it to your Google Dive. 191/Downloads/皇后CD-保种zz%20Collection (d%20Lovely.

Songs from Sweet And Lovely by Buddy De Franco, Buddy Defranco. Free download and listen Sweet And Lovely. Buddy De Franco, Buddy Defranco, Ирвинг Берлин. Tracks count: 7. Views: 9. Buddy Defranco, Buddy De Franco - What Can I Say (After I Say I'm Sorry) 04:41. Buddy De Franco - But Beautiful 04:32. Buddy De Franco - Nearness Of You 04:51.

Sweet and lovely – but plenty darn soulful too – and one of the excellent early 50s Verve dates that features the piano of Sonny Clark with the clarinet of Buddy DeFranco ! The album's got an even more unusual twist in that it features a bit of organ from Clark too – one of his only recordings on the instrument – as well as guitar from Tal Farlow on a number of tracks – another leading light of the fresh Verve sound of the 50s, really working some great music next to Buddy's horn May 2016, 14:33. The Buddy DeFranco Quintet, Sweet And Lovely. Used drive : TSSTcorpCDDVDW SE-208DB Adapter: 1 ID: 0. Read mode : Secure Utilize accurate stream : Yes Defeat audio cache : Yes Make use of C2 pointers : No.

The Buddy De Franco Quartet).

Track List

Title/Composer Performer Time
1 Getting a Balance Buddy DeFranco 9:01
2 That Old Black Magic Harold Arlen / Johnny Mercer Buddy DeFranco 6:43
3 They Say It's Wonderful Irving Berlin Buddy DeFranco 7:18
4 But Beautiful James Van Heusen Buddy DeFranco 4:38
5 The Nearness of You Hoagy Carmichael / Ned Washington Buddy DeFranco 4:57
6 What Can I Say After I Say I'm Sorry Walter Donaldson / Abe Lyman Buddy DeFranco 4:47
7 Moe Buddy DeFranco 4:07
  • I'm not the greatest fan of the clarinet, which was the most celebrated instrument during the '30s and '40s--the so-called "Swing Era"--when the two most popular instrumental stars were Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw. Both led big bands and realized revenues that exceeded (or at least matched) the leading vocal stars of the period--the foremost of which were Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby). How can you explain the instrument's hold on the American public and its complete fall from grace by 1955 (Artie wisely quit the music business in 1954, with more than half of his life in front of him; BG managed to hang on, as a nostalgia item in America pop culture and still a "star" in the eyes of the rest of the world (Russia, Japan, Europe)?Here's a theory that has never received attention in explaining the relative "disappearance" of the clarinet (except as a 2nd horn, useful for doubling in certain situations and on certain arrangements). First (and foremost), beginning in the 1960s the only instrument that "mattered" to the new and powerful consumer culture (mostly young adults, 25-45) was the guitar. Ask the "average" listener to name ANY instrumentalist, and if it's not a guitarist, it's going to be a guitarist-composer-singer (Bob Dylan, Elvis, Buck Owens, Johnny Cash), it's the rare exception that gets the public's attention--someone like Kenny G or David Sanburn.Both of the latter instruments, it must be noted, played as high as the clarinet, but were fuller and more penetrating. And this is what helps explain the mystery of the clarinet's fall from public favor: the MICROPHONE. The mic came along in time for Bing Crosby to crowd Al Jolsen from the stage, but it was not sufficiently sensitive, compact and complex to allow for amplifying an instrument in a big band (make it 3-4 on today's drummers). I saw Ray Brown playing unamplified bass in amphitheaters in the late '50s. In such a context, the clarinet was the star because it was the only instrument that could be HEARD among 20 other guys playing fff.After 1950 the clarinet no longer had the advantage it had received "by default." Artie Shaw would not have been able to marry 8 trophy wives (4 of them Hollywood stars), nor did Buddy DeFranco. But among that tiny minority of listeners who follow jazz--embracing its completelness in time and space--Buddy DeFranco was to the clarinet what Charlie Parker was to all musicians who, by the late 1940s, wanted to sound more "modern" than either Benny or Artie. He was, minimally, the equal of Benny and Artie, and he played more complex music, "musician's music." And to prove he was the "real deal," he performed with major, pyrotechnical jazz stars (entire albums with Art Tatum and Oscar Peterson) and he mined the inexhaustible challenges and beauty of "the Great American Songbook." On this album Buddy is featured with primo bebop pianist Sonny Clark and some of the jewels representing the real art of American popular song.